shortanimation:

The 2014 Academy Award Nominees for Best Short Film: Animated

FeralGet a Horse!Mr HublotPossessionsRoom on the Broom

(via shortanimation)

erikkwakkel:

Gifs before gifs
We all love gifs - those highly entertaining movable feasts that are so popular on Tumblr. Here is one, but it is one with a history that predates the internet. You are looking at a gif of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau. Dancing figures, jumping monkeys, acrobats, and figures jumping into the mouths of lions: Plateau’s stroboscopic disks produced highly entertaining mini-movies, like our modern gifs, be it over a century and a half before animation movies were first made. When we look at a gif on Tumblr, let’s remember that the technique of producing such moving images made up from a small batch of individual pictures dates back to a pre-digital world - to the days before movies, photography and digital cameras.
Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif of a 19th-century phenakistiscope presented above. Check out some (real moving) examples here, here, here and here.

erikkwakkel:

Gifs before gifs

We all love gifs - those highly entertaining movable feasts that are so popular on Tumblr. Here is one, but it is one with a history that predates the internet. You are looking at a gif of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau. Dancing figures, jumping monkeys, acrobats, and figures jumping into the mouths of lions: Plateau’s stroboscopic disks produced highly entertaining mini-movies, like our modern gifs, be it over a century and a half before animation movies were first made. When we look at a gif on Tumblr, let’s remember that the technique of producing such moving images made up from a small batch of individual pictures dates back to a pre-digital world - to the days before movies, photography and digital cameras.

Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif of a 19th-century phenakistiscope presented above. Check out some (real moving) examples hereherehere and here.

(via wlander)

cookiecarnival:

Silly Symphony - The Skeleton Dance (1929)
Directed by Walt Disney

Happy Halloween!

(via animationalley)

wannabeanimator:

The Making of Head Over Heels

Head Over Heels (2012)

Directed by Timothy Reckart

The full short can be seen here.

gameraboy:

Title cards

(via disneyhips)

Giant Steps (2007) (Recorded 1959, released 1960)

Music by John Coltrane

This isn’t necessarily a cartoon, but watch it.  It’s pretty awesome.  If you’re into music and jazz, you will love this.  The band consists of John Coltrane (tenor sax), Tommy Flanagan (piano), Paul Chambers (bass), and Art Taylor (drums).

Uncle Tom’s Cabana (1947)

Directed by Tex Avery

Warning: This film contains many stereotypes that may be considered offensive.  This rarely seen cartoon is a parody of Uncle Tom’s Cabin.  So judging by that statement alone, it’s going to raise a few eyebrows.  It is seen even less than Avery’s Merrie Melodies film Uncle Tom’s Bungalow (1937) which has the distinction of being a part of the Censored Eleven.  But in my opinion, this film has a stronger storyline and better animation.  But then again, this film uses some objectionable language, so this should be viewed with the acknowledgement that there was a market for this kind of humor, that it is a product of its time and that that doesn’t make it acceptable today.  But I believe that films like this should be viewed so as not to be swept under the rug of revisionist history.

Lonesome Lenny (1946)

Directed by Tex Avery

In the final Screwy Squirrel cartoon, Lenny the big dumb dog gets a new friend from the pet store.  The voice of Lenny is provided by Tex Avery himself.

Bingo (1998)

Directed by Chris Landreth

This film is based on a short play by Greg Kotis (Urinetown) titled Disregard This Play, and was produced by The Neo-Futurists.  Considering the group’s name, it certainly does have its roots in early Twentieth Century avant-garde theatre.  The film is a statement on conformity and brainwashing.  An interesting short from the Academy Award-winning director of Ryan.